Bill Gates

Philip Ballinger, University of Washington, Answers Six Questions

Philip Ballinger is the Assistant Vice President for Enrollment and Director of Admissions for undergraduates at the University of Washington, the Evergreen State's flagship public university. He joins us this month to answer six questions about admissions -- and life -- at "UDub."

Founded in 1861, University of Washington began as a 10-acre campus in what is now the heart of downtown Seattle, the Pacific Northwest's largest city. Today, that campus occupies the "University District" in the city of 609,000, located on the shores of Union and Portage Bays with views of the Cascade Mountain Range.  More than 43,000 students attend UW in its 16 colleges and schools, which offer 1,800 undergraduate courses each quarter in more than 250 degree programs.  (There are also satellite campuses in Tacoma and Bothell.)

College Admission in the Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal, February 21, 2012

Should Colleges Be Factories for the 1%?
Obama wants the feds to report what a college's graduates earn. That's no way to judge an educational institution.

By Robin Mamlet and Christine VanDeVelde

In his recently unveiled Blueprint for College Affordability, President Obama calls for "collecting earnings and employment information for colleges and universities, so that students can have an even better sense of the life they'll be able to build once they graduate." In other words, the government wants to publish statistics on what graduates earn after leaving Harvard or Ohio State or Duke.

The results are unlikely to surprise. For all the costs of collecting and collating this information—for the sake of reducing the costs of education, no less—it will show what is intuitively obvious: On average, Ivy League grads earn more. But the information will be worse than useless for college-bound students because it will send them all the wrong signals.